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Concert Review: Shinedown lets Carnival of Madness crowd be the boss

Stephanie Sokol for The Oakland Press

Brent Smith of Shinedown at DTE Energy Music Theatre on Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2013. Photo/The Oakland Press
Brent Smith of Shinedown at DTE Energy Music Theatre on Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2013. Photo/The Oakland Press

Shinedown lead vocalist Brent Smith was a commanding presence Tuesday night, Aug. 27, at the DTE Energy Music Theatre, uniting the crowd through both song and story during the fourth annual Carnival of Madness tour.

The group headlined this year’s lineup, which also included Papa Roach, Skillet, We As Human and In This Moment.

We As Human, from Nashville, started the show with a five-song set that included a new song, “Zombie,” which was co-written by Skillet’s John Cooper, and “I Stand,” which frontman Justin Cordle dedicated to U.S. armed forces personnel.

View slideshow of pictures from the concert by Ken Settle

In This Moment followed, with flamboyantly dressed and emotive lead singer Maria Brink leading the group through a six-song set that featured tracks “Rise With Me” and “Adrenaline,” closing with “Blood.”

Its members clad in black, Skillet turned in an energetic 70-minute, 11-song set, encouraging fans to throw their hands in the air during “Sick of It” and finishing with “Rebirthing.”

Papa Roach frontman Jacoby Shaddix, meanwhile, asked the rhetorical question, “Do we have any old-school Papa Roach fans in this (expletive)?!” as the group charged through its own 12-song, 55-minute performance. Shaddix got up close and personal with those fans, too, running into the audience during “Give Me Back My Life.”

The best was saved for last, however, as Shinedown opened its pyrotechnic-accented 14-song, 90-minute set with “I’m Not Alright,” bringing a bit of carnival-style madness with dancing carnies and the band members’ carnival-style stagewear.

Tapping into Shinedown’s faith-based roots, Smith asked fans to introduce themselves to each other and paid tribute to the group’s following, telling them they were the bosses — and then seeking to please with performances of “Diamond Eyes (Boom-Lay Boom-Lay Boom),” “If You Only Knew” and other numbers that turned into singalongs.

Shinedown slowed it down with an emotional performance “Simple Man” dedicated to bassist Eric Bass, who lost his dog of 11 years earlier that day, and ended the show with an inspiring performance of “Bully,” telling the audience to be themselves and not let others get them down.

On Tuesday, Shinedown certainly lived up to its end of that bargain.

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Features Reviews

Concert Review: Lumineers enchant crowd at DTE Energy Music Theatre

Stephanie Sokol for The Oakland Press

INDEPENDENCE TWP. — With friendly conversation and folksy music, The Lumineers brought a fun, upbeat show to the DTE Energy Music Theatre on Thursday, June 6.

The group’s 14-song, hour-and-20-minute show focused on tracks from their hit  2012 self-titled debut album, plus  a cover of Bob Dylan’s “Subterranean Homesick Blues” as well as a few unreleased songs. The live performances added more feeling and rawness to the music, intricately weaving together vocal harmonies with instrumentation that included traditional piano and guitar as well as cello and tambourine.

The Lumineers' 14-song, hour-and-20-minute show focused on tracks from their hit  2012 self-titled debut album at DTE Energy Music Theatre on Thursday, June 6. Taken with iPhone 5
The Lumineers’ 14-song, hour-and-20-minute show focused on tracks from their hit 2012 self-titled debut album at DTE Energy Music Theatre on Thursday, June 6. Taken with iPhone 5

The lively “Submarines” quickly engaged the DTE crowd as light from sparkling chandeliers overhead framed the well-dressed group. When they performed the break-out track “Ho Hey,” lead singer Wesley Keith Schultz asked the audience to put away their cell phones to live in the moment, and he got his wish — the audience responded by cheering and singing along.

lumineers

For a group that was nominated for a Grammy Award, the Lumineers proved to be down-to-earth. At one point the band members froze and stopped playing, good-naturedly milking cheers from the crowd before heading back into the song.  The group also walked into the crowd and up to the lawn for a pair of songs, pointing out that just a year ago they were actually performing in back yards and living rooms.

High-fiving their way back to the stage, the Lumineers lit into their other hit single, “Stubborn Love.”

Schultz performed a solo acoustic version of “Morning Song,” then introduced the next song, the bittersweet “Gonzo,” with a story about finding a gun in his late father’s sock drawer.

After “Big Parade” ended the show, the band lingered onstage for a few minutes, throwing drumsticks and other random souvenirs to the crowd.

The Lumineers made a good impression.